Bactria – The Bountiful, Sought-after Region of Ancient History

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Bactria – The Bountiful, Sought-after Region of Ancient History

Bactria was one of the more important historic regions of the ancient and classical world. A central point of more than one defining political event,

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Bactria was one of the more important historic regions of the ancient and classical world. A central point of more than one defining political event, Bactria experienced thousands of years of important classical history. Empires and kingdoms came and went, but many key cultures were forced to reckon with Bactria. It had a defining impact on the development of Zoroastrianism as one of the key centers of this ancient Iranian religion. Just how early does Bactria appear in documented history, and how and why did it fade away?

The region of ancient Bactria was centered in what is Afghanistan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan today. (World Imaging / Public domain )

Where do the Ancient Origins of Bactria Lie?

The name for this region that we use today comes from the ancient Greek language. Bactria derives from early Persian cuneiform inscriptions , where the name is attested as Bakthri. An even earlier form is found in the Zoroastrian religious text, the Zend Avesta. Here, we find the name Bakhdhi. Some linguists propose that this name stems from the word A-paktra, which means “northern.” This could signify that Bactria was the northernmost Arian settlement. Ariana was a general geographical term used by some Greek and Roman authors of the ancient period for the region between Central Asia and the Indus River in Pakistan, comprising the eastern provinces of the Achaemenid Empire that covered the whole of modern-day Afghanistan, as well as the easternmost part of Iran.

And this brings us to the historic geographic position of this area. Bactria covered a vast area. Its capital city was Bactra (modern-day Balkh in Afghanistan). It consisted originally of a vast plain that stretched between the ancient Oxus River (modern Amu Darya River) and the Hindu Kush mountains. The Oxus River gave Bactria an extremely fertile landscape, as it was filled with agricultural oases and was kept fed with its many tributaries, including the Tashkurgan, Sar-e-Pol, and Balk.

More broadly speaking, Bactria was situated in Central Asia (in whose history it played a major role), and nestled north of the Hindu Kush , south of the Tian Shan mountains, and west of the Pamirs, with the Oxus River flowing through its center. Nowadays, this region corresponds to parts of Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan.

Of course, at certain times in its long history, Bactria’s boundaries changed, either expanding or decreasing. To the west, beyond these borders, lay the great Carmanian desert, and also the grassy downs of Margiana and Aria. To the north, beyond the expanse of the Oxus River, stretched the vast territory of Sogdiana, and beyond it the limitless steppes of Central Asia, where the fierce Scythian warrior culture lived.

The Oxus River (known as the Amu Darya River today) provided Bactria with immense water resources that fueled its prosperity as an agricultural hub in the ancient world. (joepyrek / CC BY-SA 2.0)

The Oxus River (known as the Amu Darya River today) provided Bactria with immense water resources that fueled its prosperity as an agricultural hub in the ancient world. (joepyrek / CC BY-SA 2.0 )

Bactria: A Land of Abundance and Great Wealth

As we consider this unique geographical position, we can quickly understand that Bactria was a very fertile region. Thanks to the Oxus River and its tributaries, it was well-irrigated, and notably bountiful. The Greek historian Strabo called it the “pride of Ariana.” The Avesta names it “beautiful Bactria, crowned with flags.” While the Roman writer Quintus Curtius left a detailed account of the land itself:

“The soil of Bactria varies considerably in its nature. In some spots extensive orchards and vineyards produce abundant fruit of a most delicious quality. The soil there is rich and well-watered. The warmer parts produce crops of corn, while the rest is better for pasture-land. The fertile portion is densely populated, and rears an incredible number of horses.”

Of course, being so bountiful and rich in products and goods, Bactria was a coveted territory for many conquerors. This meant that at numerous times in its history, it was ruled over by different kingdoms, empires and civilizations because everyone wanted control of this wealthy region.

One of the earliest historic mentions of Bactria comes from the famous list of conquests made by Darius the Great , the third Persian “King of Kings,” who reigned from 522 BC until his death in 486 BC. This, together with a mention from a fragment of work by Ctesias of Cnidus, was written after Bactria as a region was incorporated into the growing Achaemenid Empire.

The ancient Greek historian, Ctesias, also writes of the region’s earlier history, indicating that it was well known to the Greeks. He writes that in the late 9th and early 8th centuries BC, the Assyrian King Ninus, and later his wife, Semiramis, led campaigns to conquer Bactria. Following this conquest, the region became a wealthy kingdom of numerous towns, governed from the wealthy capital of Bactra. Ctesias of Cnidus was the physician of Artaxerxes II, another King of Kings of the Achaemenid Empire, and thus had the access to their royal archives.

The tradition of the Zoroastrian religion , especially the Avesta text, also mention Bactria. Certain writings state that the ruler of Bactria once gave protection to Zoroaster (Zarathustra). This would mean that Bactria existed for many centuries and even millennia in the BC period, a claim that has been disputed by modern historians.

Bronze Age goddesses of ancient Bactria, Afghanistan, dated to roughly 2000-1800 BC. On display at the Ancient Orient Museum in Tokyo, Japan. (I, PHGCOM / CC BY-SA 3.0)

Bronze Age goddesses of ancient Bactria, Afghanistan, dated to roughly 2000-1800 BC. On display at the Ancient Orient Museum in Tokyo, Japan. (I, PHGCOM / CC BY-SA 3.0 )

Bactria: A Key Highway for Cultures and Civilizations

Nevertheless, modern archaeology proves that the region was very fertile and a hub for rising civilizations in the Bronze Age. Evidence exists of big oasis communities that had well-developed irrigation systems and practiced extensive trade with their neighbors, dealing in valuable goods such as lapis lazuli and bronze.

The Bactria-Margiana Archeological Complex , dated to 2,200-1,700 BC was a rich archeological culture that developed in the region. From this well-attested culture, historians proposed that the Indo-Iranians developed, later migrating north and south from Bactria.

The legendary Persian leader, Cyrus the Great, annexed Bactria in the 6th century BC. The area became part of the vast Persian Empire, and was declared its 12th satrapy (basically, a province). Sources state that Cyrus managed to annex the land without resorting to conquest, but rather through diplomacy. The annexation was preceded by the “union of two crowns.”

As a satrapy, Bactria enjoyed a certain special status, and was governed by a crown prince. It was one of the wealthiest of all Persian satrapies, mostly thanks to its fertile lands, and its especially strategic position on the royal road to India, from which it enjoyed numerous profits.

The nobles of Bactria were immensely wealthy and held all the power within the satrapy . Of course, all this fertility and wealth meant that Bactria paid a substantial tribute to the Persian rulers. This was attested as 360 talents of silver per year (one talent measured roughly 33 kilograms or 75 pounds).

The importance of Bactria was not solely because of its economic wealth: its military strength was also a key factor in the region’s significance. It was a land filled with quality horses and many fortified towns. As such, Bactria boasted an efficient cavalry throughout its history. For the Persians, this contribution was very important. The heavy Bactrian cavalry was commanded directly by the Persian king. And it was at the leading edge of the Battle of Gaugamela, where the Persians almost beat the Macedonians, who were led by Alexander the Great.

When Alexander the Great began his successful conflict against the Persians, a major turning point in Bactrian history also began. During the conflicts with Alexander, Bactria became the foremost center of Iranian resistance against the Macedonian invaders, especially following the fall of the Achaemenid Empire. However, it did not hold out for long. Before long, Alexander the Great subdued Bactria and married Roxana, the daughter of the Bactrian satrap Oxyartes.

Alas, Alexander died soon after and Bactria became a satrapy governed by Phillip III (one of Alexander’s successors). When the vast empire of Alexander was divided by his competing heirs and generals, Bactria was incorporated into the Seleucid Empire .

Plate depicting Cybele, an Anatolian mother goddess, pulled by lions from the ancient city of Ai Khanoum. Ai Khanoum was one of the primary cities of the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom. Alexander the Great is believed to have founded the city in around 327 BC. (Public domain)

Plate depicting Cybele, an Anatolian mother goddess, pulled by lions from the ancient city of Ai Khanoum. Ai Khanoum was one of the primary cities of the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom. Alexander the Great is believed to have founded the city in around 327 BC. ( Public domain )

The Birth of the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom

After a while, the power of the Seleucid Empire began to wane, especially during the reign of Antiochus II (reigned 261-247 BC). This weakening was an opportunity for the Bactrians to secede and regain their independence.

Diodotus I Soter, a Greek ruler in Bactria, was the one to achieve independence around 245 BC. Already by that time, a distinct Greco-Bactrian identity was forming in the region, especially after the establishment of numerous Greek towns which were populated by masses of deported Greeks.

Around 208 BC, the Seleucids once more regained its military might and attempted to wrest Bactria back from the hands of Euthydemus I, the Greco-Bactrian King. Antiochus III attempted to re-affirm the domination of his empire, and invaded Bactria. After a two-year siege of the capital Bactra, Antiochus III failed in his attempt and had to officially recognize Bactria’s independence and sign an alliance with their king.

Following this, the Greeks in Bactria became immensely powerful, establishing the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom that quickly expanded its borders. Strabo, in his ancient writings, states:

“As for Bactria, a part of it lies alongside Aria towards the north, though most of it lies above Aria and to the east of it. And much of it produces everything except oil. The Greeks who caused Bactria to revolt grew so powerful on account of the fertility of the country that they became masters, not only of Bactria and beyond, but also of India, as Apollodorus of Artemita says: and more tribes were subdued by them than by Alexander…”

A gold 20-stater of Eucratides (the last important king of Greek Bactria), the largest known gold coin from antiquity. The coin weighs 169.2 grams (6 ounces) and has a diameter of 58 millimeters (2.3 inches). It was originally found in Bukhara, Uzbekistan, which was part of Bactria at the time. (Eucratides I / CC0)

A gold 20-stater of Eucratides (the last important king of Greek Bactria), the largest known gold coin from antiquity. The coin weighs 169.2 grams (6 ounces) and has a diameter of 58 millimeters (2.3 inches). It was originally found in Bukhara, Uzbekistan, which was part of Bactria at the time. (Eucratides I / CC0)

The Long Rise and Quick Fall of Hellenistic Bactria

Euthydemus, and his son and heir Demetrius I, both crossed over into the Indus valley in conquest, trying to expand their kingdom. They were successful, and soon the kingdom expanded well beyond the Hindu Kush mountains. It reached its maximum extent in 180 BC, and by then a vast Hellenic world had emerged in and around Bactria.

Alas, where there is great wealth and power, there is also discontent. The Greco-Bactrian Kingdom was plagued by instability and inner power struggles, with the throne continuously usurped. Usurpers arose at every corner, and local wars quickly erupted.

In the south, across the Hindu Kush, a separate Indo-Greek kingdom began to gain power, further weakening the Greco-Bactrians. Greatly weakened by interior conflicts and separated from the south, the Bactrians could not withstand an invasion.

Starting in 160 BC, Bactria was gradually conquered by the fierce nomads of the steppes, chiefly the Sakas, a tribe belonging to the Scythian cultures. These Sakas were in turn overthrown by the so-called Yuezhi (nomadic Indo-European peoples), who also settled in Bactria.

By the 1st century BC, the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom was no more. The turbulent episodes of history passed over it surprisingly quickly, leaving the Hellenistic heritage in the region reduced to next to nothing.

Strabo writes that the tribes which he names “Tokhari, Pasiani, Sakarauli, and Asii,” all participated in the destruction of the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom. The above-mentioned Yuezhi, of which history does not know a lot, subsequently expanded from Bactria and formed the powerful but short lived Kushan Empire.

A Kushan prince, said to be Huvishka, making a donation to a Boddhisattva, which signifies the growing importance of Buddhism in Bactria. (I, Sailko / CC BY-SA 3.0)

A Kushan prince, said to be Huvishka, making a donation to a Boddhisattva, which signifies the growing importance of Buddhism in Bactria. (I, Sailko / CC BY-SA 3.0 )

The Great Crossroads of History

The Kushans, who introduced Buddhism to Bactria, in turn lost power in the region in the 3rd century AD, following an invasion from the famed Sasanian Persian King of Kings, Shapur I. Following this, a distinct region was formed in place of Bactria, which is known in modern historiography as the Kushano-Sasanian Kingdom.

By the 7th century AD, the Rashidun Arab Caliphate had swept over the region, conquering Bactria. From that point on Islam becomes the dominant religion in the area. By then, the turbulent history of antiquity was long gone and gradually forgotten. Its remnants slowly buried by time in the vast Bactrian landscapes.

The history of Bactria is a great “cutaway” glimpse into the crucial events of classical antiquity and classical history. Rich and fertile, it was sought after by all who knew of it. This meant that Bactria became a crossroads for conquering rulers. It saw the Achaemenids, the Macedonians, the Greeks and the steppe nomads, Persians and Arabs.

It is also a great example of how easily powerful kingdoms and empires arose in ancient times only to plummet to nothing in a couple of decades. And for all passionate historians and lovers of history, the tales of Bactria are thrilling and filled with important classical players and events.

Top image: The ruins of Yamchun Fortress near Pamir, on the border of Afghanistan, where one can still see remains of the ancient classical culture of Bactria. Source: Jonny / Adobe Stock

By Aleksa Vučković

References

Cohel, G. 2013. The Hellenistic Settlements in the East from Armenia and Mesopotamia to Bactria and India. University of California Press.
Grenet, F. and Leriche, P. 1988. Bactria. Encyclopaedia Iranica.
Holt, F. L. 1988. Alexander the Great and Bactria: The Formation of a Greek Frontier in Central Asia. Brill Archive.
Rawlinson, G. H. 2002. Bactria, the History of a Forgotten Empire. Asian Educational Services.

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